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KFOR Book Chats – 2002

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Starting in April 2002, and continuing through November 2018, a panel of library staff members have appeared somewhat regularly on Cathy Blythe’s Problems and Solutions program on radio station KFOR 1240 AM & 103.3 FM in a segment called “Book Chat,” sharing information about books, literacy and library programs. Here is a list of the books discussed on the shows during 2002:

December, 2002

Simplify Your Life: 100 Ways to Slow Down and Enjoy the Things That Really Matter
by Elaine St. James [304.23 Sai] [ currently available from the libraries only as an audiobook-on-CD ]

A refreshing antidote to the disorder of everyday life, this funny and insightful book shows how to bring happiness into daily life by taking unwanted things out of it.


Simple Abundance: A Daybook of Comfort and Joy
by Sarah Ban Breathnach [158.12 Ban]

Quotations, poems, meditations and practical exercises for every day of a woman’s year include inspirational messages, money-saving suggestions, gardening and decorating ideas, and thoughts on personal fulfullment.


Making Choices: Discover the Joy in Living the Life You Want to Lead
by Alexandra Stoddard [ not in libraries’ collection — try our InterLibrary Loan service ]

Alexandra Stoddard, world famous interior decorator, author and lecturer, originally opened the eyes of millions to the beauty and grace of simplicity in her phenomenal bestseller Living a Beautiful Life and the books that followed. Now, in Making Choices, she teaches us to widen our horizons by helping us feel the pleasure, satifaction, and joy of creative decision making and self-reliance and to discover our inner being, our own destiny, the lifestyle that is ours, and the art of living in the light of self-expression and fulfillment.


50 Simple Things You Can Do to Improve Your Personal Finances
by Ilyce R. Glink [332.024 Gli]

Everything you need to know about personal finance — whether you’re just starting out or starting over.

The hardest part of attaining personal financial freedom is getting started. Ilyce R. Glink makes it a snap. The smart, simple strategies presented in 50 Simple Things You Can Do to Improve Your Personal Finances let you take immediate control of your money. With her trademark wit, friendly style, and crystal-clear examples, Ilyce Glink helps you set financial goals and reach them. Topics include:

* Starting Out * Budgets and Savings * Credit, Credit Reports, and Debt * Investing Yourself in Investments * Big Purchases * The Ins and Outs of Insurance * Taxes * Marriage, Partnerships, Children * Planning for Your Retirement.


Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes
by Chris Crutcher

Called a “masterpiece” in a starred review from School Library Journal, award-winning author Chris Crutcher’s acclaimed Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes is an enduring classic.

This bestselling novel is about love, loyalty, and friendship in the face of adversity. “Superb plotting, extraordinary characters, and cracking narrative make this novel unforgettable.”–Publishers Weekly

Sarah Byrnes and Eric Calhoune have been friends for years. When they were children, his weight and her scars made them both outcasts. Now Sarah Byrnes–the smartest, toughest person Eric has ever known–sits silent in a hospital. Eric must uncover the terrible secret she’s hiding before its dark current pulls them both under. Will appeal to fans of Marieke Nijkamp, Andrew Smith, and John Corey Whaley.

“Once again, Chris Crutcher plunges his readers into life’s tough issues within a compelling story filled with human compassion . . . with his characteristic intelligence, humor, and empathy.”–ALAN Review

An American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults.


Blood and Chocolate
by Annette Curtis Klause

In Blood and Chocolate, Annette Curtis Klause does for werewolves what Anne Rice has done for vampires. Sixteen-year-old Vivian Gandillon is trying to fit in to her new home in the suburbs. But trying to act “normal” isn’t always easy, since Vivian and her family are werewolves. It’s glorious to have the power to change, and Vivian is a beautiful loup-garou with all the young wolves howling for her. But she wants no part of her squabbling pack, left leaderless by her father’s recent death. Then Vivian falls in love with a human, a meat-boy. If she reveals herself, will he relish the magic of her dual nature? When a brutal murder threatens the pack’s survival, Vivian’s divided loyalties are further strained. What is she really–human or beast.


Monster
by Walter Dean Myers

This New York Times bestselling novel from acclaimed author Walter Dean Myers tells the story of Steve Harmon, a teenage boy in juvenile detention and on trial. Presented as a screenplay of Steve’s own imagination, and peppered with journal entries, the book shows how one single decision can change our whole lives.

Monster is a multi-award-winning, provocative coming-of-age story that was the first-ever Michael L. Printz Award recipient, an ALA Best Book, a Coretta Scott King Honor selection, and a National Book Award finalist. In 2016, Monster was turned into a film starring Jennifer Hudson, Kelvin Harrison, Jr., and A$AP Rocky.

The late Walter Dean Myers was a National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, who was known for his commitment to realistically depicting kids from his hometown of Harlem.


The Body of Christopher Creed
by Carol Plum-Ucci

Chris Creed grew up as the class freak–the bullies’ punching bag. After he vanished, the weirdness that had once surrounded him began spreading. It was as if a darkness reached out of his void to grab at the most normal, happy people–like some twisted joke or demented form of justice. It tore the town apart. Sixteen-year-old Torey Adams’s search for answers opens his eyes to the lies, the pain, and the need to blame when tragedy strikes, and his once-safe world comes crashing down around him.


The Rules For Marriage: Time-Tested Secrets for Making Your Marriage Work
by Ellen Fein and Sherrie Schneider [306.81 Fei]

The authors of the bestselling The Rules and The Rules II are back with advice for women who have the ring and want to ensure a satisfying and fulfilling marriage.


The 50 Secrets of Highly Successful Cats
by Colleen Q. O’Shea with Crumbum Q. McIntosh [ not in libraries’ collection — try our InterLibrary Loan service ]

Written by cats for cats, a delightfully clever, beautifully illustrated guide to living with humans includes tips on how to rule the home, managing human companions, and learning to be a cat with an attitude.


The Quotable Feline
by Jim Dratfield and Paul Coughlin [ not in libraries’ collection — try our InterLibrary Loan service ]

45 cats, young and old, smiling and morose, affectionate and aloof. Each is accompanied by an apt quotation (“Dogs come when they’re called. Cats takes a message and get back to you.”) drawn from a variety of the most articulate celebrators of the cat, including Chekhov and Colette, Hemingway and Jules Verne, Leonardo da Vinci (“The smallest feline is a masterpiece.”) and Jim Davis of Garfield fame.

A cat along by the telephone, a cat eyeing a goldfish, a cat returning the love of a person, an intrepid explorer kitten–image after image, printed in glowing sepia tones on ivory paper, demonstrates the special grace and intuition that Dratfield and Coughlin bring to the photography of animals.

This beautiful cat book is sure to be the perfect holiday treat for your favorite cat lover.


November, 2002

The Dog Listener
by Jan Fennell [636.708 Fen]

Jan Fennell’s remarkable gifts have earned her the nickname “the dog whisperer.” Her unique knowledge of the canine world and its instinctive language has enabled her to bring even the most desperate and troubled dogs to heel. This easy-to-follow guide to Jan’s simple techniques draws on her countless case histories of problem dogs — from biters and barkers to bicycle chasers — to show how we can bridge the language barrier that separates man from his best friend.

The Dog Listener is a moving and inspiring story. Jan tells of the tragic death that first led her to reassess conventional attitudes toward dogs. She describes how she grew determined to find a more compassionate alternative to standard “obedience” training techniques. Most important of all, she brings the reader to an understanding of her method, one made all the more remarkable by its simplicity. Her book will fascinate animal lovers and prove indispensable to dog owners.


A Pedigree to Die For
by Laurien Berenson

Laurien Berenson is author of the delightful Melanie Travis canine cozy mystery series, including Jingle Bell Bark and Best in Show . She has a degree in psychology from Vassar College and has been married for almost twenty-five years. She lives in Georgia with her husband, her son, six dogs, and two Welsh ponies.


Talking Dirty With the Queen of Clean
by Linda Cobb [648.5 Cob]

Offers advice on how to clean a multitude of household objects including everything from the kitchen sink to leather car upholstery, and provides tips on how to use tea to clean wood and vinegar to remove rust.


A Week in Winter
by Marcia Willett

A Different Kind of Love Story.

When Mary Beth Crain lost her husband of only three years to cancer, she though she would never again know the meaning of the word happiness. Inconsolable, she couldn’t imagine anything with the power to draw her out of the seemingly bottomless pit of grief.

But there was a savior – or two – on the horizon, in the form of President Harry S. Truman, Mary Beth’s idol, from whose practical wisdom she had always drawn strength, and his namesake, Truman, a three-pound Chihuahua. Drawing upon Harry Truman’s wise words, and the small but powerful furry presence that brightened her world, Crain shares her experience of overcoming loss by finding inspiration and joy in both her dog and a former president who was the embodiment of common sense, integrity, and optimism


A Widow, a Chihuahua, and Harry Truman
by Mary Beth Crain [ not in libraries’ collection — try our InterLibrary Loan service ]

Any reader who has ever fallen in love with a house will understand the attraction of Moorgate, a light-and-fresh-air-filled old farmhouse on the edge of the moor in Cornwall. The enchanting house now belongs to seventy-something Maudie Todhunter, the late Lord Todhunter’s free-spirited second wife. (The first wife, Hilda, was supposedly a paragon of virtue, and Maudie has always felt second-best.) The light of Maudie’s life is her vivacious stepgranddaughter, Posy, who begs Maudie to board a giant English mastiff whom Posy’s mean-spirited mother has banned from the house. (The large and ungainly Polonius is an impossibly lovable canine who outshines Lassie by a mile and is destined to become a favorite of readers worldwide.)

When Maudie decides to sell Moorgate, all kinds of old family secrets come to light, and so the saga begins. Along the way, Rob, the contractor of Moorhouse, falls in love with a woman who has a sad secret. Posy’s father falls in love with someone kinder than his shrewish wife. Maudie must reevaluate someone she’d fallen in love with years ago. And as the connections intertwine between the past and the present, many unexpected alliances form.


Paws to Consider
by Brian Kilcommons and Sarah Wilson [636.7 Kil]

The authors of Good Owners, Great Dogs provide the straight scoop on selecting the perfect dog for one’s lifestyle and personality.


October, 2002

Sailing Alone Around the Room
by Billy Collins [811 Col]

“High, most encouraging tidings”–that is how Billy Collins, the widely read and widely acclaimed poet, describes the music in his poem about the gospel singing group The Sensational Nightingales. The same phrase applies, just as joyfully, to the arrival of Sailing Alone Around the Room , a landmark collection of new and selected poems by this Guggenheim Fellow, NPR contributor, New York Public Library “Literary Lion,” and incomparably popular performer of his own good works.

From four earlier collections, which have secured for him a national reputation, Collins offers the lyric equivalent of an album of Greatest Hits. In “Forgetful-ness,” memories of the contents of a novel “retire to the southern hemisphere of the brain, to a little fishing village where there are no phones.” In “Osso Buco,” a poem about gustatory pleasure, the “lion of content-ment” places a warm heavy paw on the poet’s chest. In “Marginalia,” he catalogs the scrawled comments of books’ previous readers: ” ‘Absolutely,’ they shout to Duns Scotus and James Baldwin. ‘Yes.’ ‘Bull’s-eye.’ ‘My man!’ ” And he also serves us a generous portion of new poems, including “Man Listening to Disc,” a jazz trip with headphones, and “The Iron Bridge,” a wildly speculative, moving elegy.

Whether old or new, these poems will catch their readers by exhilarating surprise. They may begin with irony and end in lyric transcendence. They may open with humor and close with grief. They may, and often do, begin with the everyday and end with infinity. Wise, funny, sad, stealthy, and always perfectly clear, these poems will not be departing for that little fishing village with no phones for a long, long time. Billy Collins, possessed of a unique lyric voice, is one of American poetry’s most sensational nightingales.


Tricky Business
by Dave Barry

The Extravaganza of the Seasis a five-thousand-ton cash cow, a top-heavy tub whose sole function is to carry gamblers three miles from the Florida coast, take their money, then bring them back so they can find more money. In the middle of a tropical storm one night, these characters are among the passengers it carries: Fay Benton, a single mom and cocktail waitress desperate for something to go right for once; Johnny and the Contusions, a ship’s band with so little talent they are . . . well, the ship’s band; Arnold and Phil, two refugees from the Beaux Arts Senior Center; Lou Tarant, a wide, bald man who has killed nine people, though none recently; and an assortment of uglies whose job it is to facilitate the ship’s true business, which is money-laundering or drug-smuggling or . . . something. What happens to them all in the midst of the fiercest storm in years, the unpredictable ways in which this trip will change their lives and send them ricocheting off each other like a giant game of pinball, is the story of this astonishing, wickedly satisfying, all-too-human novel by “one of the funniest writers alive” (Carl Hiaasen).


Big Trouble
by Dave Barry

The humorist offers a fiction debut that describes the lives of the troubled denizens of Coconut Grove, including a career-threatened adman, an alcoholic embezzler dodging a couple of hit men, and their dysfunctional families..


Gallow’s Thief
by Bernard Cornwell

A spellbinding historical drama about an ex-soldier in 1820s London who must help rescue an innocent man from Death Row, by bestselling author Bernard Cornwell.

It is the end of the Napoleonic Wars and England has just fought its last victorious battle against the French. As Rider Sandman and the other heroes of Waterloo begin to make their way back to England, they find a country where corruption, poverty, and social unrest run rampant, and where “justice” is most often delivered at the end of a hangman’s noose. Nowhere in London are the streets as busy as in front of Newgate Prison, its largest penitentiary, where mobs gather regularly to watch the terrible spectacle of the doomed men and women on the gallows’ stands.

Rider Sandman — whose reputation on the battlefields of France is exceeded only by his renown on the cricket fields of England — returns home from war to discover his personal affairs in a shambles. Creditors have taken over his estate, leaving him penniless — and forcing him to release the woman he loves from her obligations to marry him. Desperate to right his situation, he accepts the offer of a job investigating the claims of innocence by a painter due to hang for murder in a few days’ time. The Home Secretary makes it clear that this is pro-forma, and that he expects Sandman to rubber-stamp the verdict.But Sandman’s investigation reveals that something is amiss — that there is merit to the young artist’s claims. He further discovers that, though the Queen herself has ordered a reinvestigation of the circumstances, someone else does not want the truth revealed.

In a race against the clock, Sandman moves from the hellish bowels of Newgate prison to the perfumed drawing rooms of the aristocracy, determined to rescue the innocent man from the rope. As he begins to peel back the layers of an utterly corrupt penal system, he finds himself pitted against some of the wealthiest and most ruthless men in Regency England.

Gallows Thief combines the rich historical texture of Edward Rutherford and the taut suspense of Caleb Carr to create an eviscerating portrait of capital punishment in nineteeth-century London.


1916: A Novel of the Irish Rebellion
by Morgan Llywelyn

Ned Halloran has lost both his parents, and almost his own life, to the sinking of the Titanic, and has lost his sister to America. Determined to keep what little he has, he returns to Ireland and enrolls at Saint Enda’s school in Dublin. Saint Enda’s headmaster is the renowned scholar and poet, Patrick Pearse – who is soon to gain greater and undying fame as a rebel and patriot. Ned becomes totally involved with the growing revolution…and the sacrifices it will demand. Meanwhile, in America, his sister feels her own urge toward freedom, both for her native Ireland and herself. Kathleen too becomes involved in the larger struggle, as America’s role in the Irish fight for freedom escalates. The novel examines the Irish fight for freedom, which parallels in so many ways America’s own bid for independence. For the first time, it gives us a look at the heroic women who were willing to fight and die beside their men for the sake of the future. Above all, 1916 is the story of the valiant patriots who, for a few unforgettable days, held out against the might of empire to realize an impossible dream.


The Man Who Listens to Horses
by Monty Roberts [636.108 Rob]

Monty Roberts is a real-life horse whisperer — an American original whose gentle training methods reveal the depth of communication possible between man and animal. He can take a wild, high-strung horse who has never before been handled and persuade that horse to accept a bridle, saddle, and rider in 30 minutes. His powers may seem like magic, but his amazing ‘horse sense’ is based on a lifetime of experience. Roberts started riding at the age of two, and at the age of 13 he went alone into the high deserts of Nevada to study mustangs in the wild. What he learned there changed his life forever. In The Man Who Listens to Horses, he tells about his early days as a rodeo rider in California, his violent horse-trainer father, who was unwilling to accept Monty’s unconventional training methods, his friendship with James Dean, his struggle to be accepted in the professional horse-training community, and the invitation that changed his life — to demonstrate his method of join-up to the Queen of England. From his groundbreaking work with horses, Roberts has acquired an unprecedented understanding of nonverbal communication, an understanding that applies to human relationships as well. He has shown that between parent and child, employee and employer (he’s worked with over 250 corporations, including General Motors, IBM, Disney, and Merrill Lynch), and abuser and abused, there are forms of communication far stronger than the spoken word and that they are accessible to all who will learn to listen.


From a Buick 8
by Stephen King

WANT TO GO FOR A RIDE…?

In a secret shed behind the barracks of the Pennsylvania State Police, Troop D, there’s a cherry Buick Roadmaster no one has touched in years — because there’s more power under the hood than anyone can handle…..


A Guide to the Ghosts of Lincoln
by Alan Boye [917.822 Boy] [About Lincoln, NE!]

Expanded second edition of this popular local favorite — chronicling the local sites associated with ghost legends, including “The Ghost of Nebraska Wesleyan” and many more…


September, 2002

Murder on the Iditarod Trail
by Sue Henry

The winner of Alaska’s world-famous Iditarod — a grueling, eleven-hundred-mile dog sled race across a frigid Arctic wilderness—takes home a $250,000 purse. But this year, the prize is survival. Only the toughest and the most able come to compete in this annual torturous test of endurance, skill, and courage. Now, suddenly and inexplicably, the top Iditarod contestants are dying one by one in bizarre and gruesome ways. Jessie Arnold, Alaska’s premier female “musher,” fears she may be the next intended victim, but nothing is going to prevent her from aggressively pursuing the glory and the rewards that victory brings. Dedicated State Trooper Alex Jensen is determined to track down the murderer before more innocent blood stains the pristine Alaskan snow. But Jensen’s hunt is leading him into the frozen heart of the perilous wild that Jessie Arnold knows so well — a merciless place far from any vestige of civilization, where nature can kill as fast as a bullet…and only the Arctic night can hear your final screams.


A Cold Day for Murder
by Dana Stabenow

Kate Shugak returns to her roots in the far Alaskan north, after leaving the Anchorage D.A.’s office. Her deductive powers are definitely needed when a ranger disappears. Looking for clues among the Aleutian pipeliners, she begins to realize the fine line between lies and loyalties–between justice served and cold murder.


Woodswoman: Living Alone in the Adirondak Mountains
by Anne LaBastille [ not in libraries’ collection — try our InterLibrary Loan service ]

Ecologist Anne LaBastille created the life that many people dream about. When she and her husband divorced, she needed a place to live. Through luck and perseverance, she found the ideal spot: a 20-acre parcel of land in the Adirondack mountains, where she built the cozy, primitive log cabin that became her permanent home. Miles from the nearest town, LaBastille had to depend on her wits, ingenuity, and the help of generous neighbors for her survival. In precise, poetic language, she chronicles her adventures on Black Bear Lake, capturing the power of the landscape, the rhythms of the changing seasons, and the beauty of nature’s many creatures. Most of all, she captures the struggle to balance her need for companionship and love with her desire for independence and solitude. Woodswoman is not simply a book about living in the wilderness, it is a book about living that contains a lesson for us all.


Red Dragon
by Thomas Harris

Feed your fears with this terrifying classic that introduced cannibalistic serial killer Hannibal Lecter.

FBI agent Will Graham once risked his sanity to capture Hannibal Lecter, an ingenious killer like no other. Now, he’s following the bloodstained pattern of the Tooth Fairy, a madman who’s already wiped out two families.

To find him, Graham has to understand him. To understand him, Graham has only one place left to go: the mind of Dr. Lecter.


Cold Mountain
by Charles Frazier

Cold Mountain is an extraordinary novel about a soldier’s perilous journey back to his beloved at the end of the Civil War. At once a magnificent love story and a harrowing account of one man’s long walk home, Cold Mountain introduces a stunning new talent in American literature.

Based on local history and family stories passed down by the author’s great-great-grandfather, Cold Mountain is the tale of a wounded soldier, Inman, who walks away from the ravages of the war and back home to his prewar sweetheart, Ada. Inman’s odyssey through the devastated landscape of the soon-to-be-defeated South interweaves with Ada’s struggle to revive her father’s farm, with the help of an intrepid young drifter named Ruby. As their long-separated lives begin to converge at the close of the war, Inman and Ada confront the vastly transformed world they’ve been delivered.

Charles Frazier reveals marked insight into man’s relationship to the land and the dangers of solitude. He also shares with the great nineteenth century novelists a keen observation of a society undergoing change. Cold Mountain re-creates a world gone by that speaks eloquently to our time.


Plainsong
by Kent Haruf

A heartstrong story of family and romance, tribulation and tenacity, set on the High Plains east of Denver.
In the small town of Holt, Colorado, a high school teacher is confronted with raising his two boys alone after their mother retreats first to the bedroom, then altogether. A teenage girl — her father long since disappeared, her mother unwilling to have her in the house — is pregnant, alone herself, with nowhere to go. And out in the country, two brothers, elderly bachelors, work the family homestead, the only world they’ve ever known.

From these unsettled lives emerges a vision of life, and of the town and landscape that bind them together — their fates somehow overcoming the powerful circumstances of place and station, their confusion, curiosity, dignity and humor intact and resonant. As the milieu widens to embrace fully four generations, Kent Haruf displays an emotional and aesthetic authority to rival the past masters of a classic American tradition.

Utterly true to the rhythms and patterns of life, Plainsong is a novel to care about, believe in, and learn from.


Whispers and Lies
by Joy Fielding

Fielding’s story of a middle-aged woman whose tranquil, solitary life is shaken when a mysterious woman rents the small cottage behind her house.


The Codicil
by Tom Topor [ not in libraries’ collection — try our InterLibrary Loan service ]

When a New York telecommunications magnate shocks his family by leaving half of his estate to a child he fathered in Vietnam, a street-smart former lawyer must find out whether the child is still alive.


Possession : A Romance
by A.S. Byatt

Winner of England’s Booker Prize and the literary sensation of the year, Possession is an exhilarating novel of wit and romance, at once an intellectual mystery and triumphant love story. It is the tale of a pair of young scholars researching the lives of two Victorian poets. As they uncover their letters, journals, and poems, and track their movements from London to Yorkshire–from spiritualist séances to the fairy-haunted far west of Brittany–what emerges is an extraordinary counterpoint of passions and ideas.nbsp;

An exhilarating novel of wit and romance, an intellectual mystery, and a triumphant love story. This tale of a pair of young scholars researching the lives of two Victorian poets became a huge bookseller favorite, and then on to national bestellerdom.


The Orchid Thief
by Susan Orlean [635.934 OrcYo]

In Susan Orlean’s mesmerizing true story of beauty and obsession is John Laroche, a renegade plant dealer and sharply handsome guy, in spite of the fact that he is missing his front teeth and has the posture of al dente spaghetti. In 1994, Laroche and three Seminole Indians were arrested with rare orchids they had stolen from a wild swamp in south Florida that is filled with some of the world’s most extraordinary plants and trees. Laroche had planned to clone the orchids and then sell them for a small fortune to impassioned collectors. After he was caught in the act, Laroche set off one of the oddest legal controversies in recent memory, which brought together environmentalists, Native Amer-ican activists, and devoted orchid collectors. The result is a tale that is strange, compelling, and hilarious.

New Yorker writer Susan Orlean followed Laroche through swamps and into the eccentric world of Florida’s orchid collectors, a subculture of aristocrats, fanatics, and smugglers whose obsession with plants is all-consuming. Along the way, Orlean learned the history of orchid collecting, discovered an odd pattern of plant crimes in Florida, and spent time with Laroche’s partners, a tribe of Seminole Indians who are still at war with the United States. There is something fascinating or funny or truly bizarre on every page of The Orchid Thief: the story of how the head of a famous Seminole chief came to be displayed in the front window of a local pharmacy; or how seven hundred iguanas were smuggled into Florida; or the case of the only known extraterrestrial plant crime. Ultimately, however, Susan Orlean’s book is about passion itself, and the amazing lengths to which people will go to gratify it. That passion is captured with singular vision in The Orchid Thief, a once-in-a-lifetime story by one of our most original journalists.


August, 2002

A Short Guide to a Happy Life
by Anna Quindlen [170.44 Qui]

From the New York Times bestselling author of Alternate Side, Anna Quindlen’s classic reflection on a meaningful life makes a perfect gift for any occasion.

“Life is made of moments, small pieces of silver amidst long stretches of tedium. It would be wonderful if they came to us unsummoned, but particularly in lives as busy as the ones most of us lead now, that won’t happen. We have to teach ourselves now to live, really live . . . to love the journey, not the destination.”

In this treasure of a book, Anna Quindlen, the bestselling novelist and columnist, reflects on what it takes to “get a life”–to live deeply every day and from your own unique self, rather than merely to exist through your days. “Knowledge of our own mortality is the greatest gift God ever gives us,” Quindlen writes, “because unless you know the clock is ticking, it is so easy to waste our days, our lives.” Her mother died when Quindlen was nineteen: “It was the dividing line between seeing the world in black and white, and in Technicolor. The lights came on for the darkest possible reason. . . . I learned something enduring, in a very short period of time, about life. And that was that it was glorious, and that you had no business taking it for granted.” But how to live from that perspective, to fully engage in our days? In A Short Guide to a Happy Life, Quindlen guides us with an understanding that comes from knowing how to see the view, the richness in living.


Catnap
by Carole Nelson Douglas

“Catnap” is the first book in Carole Nelson Douglas’s delightful Midnight Louie mystery series where we meet that fabulous 20-lb black cat-about-town and his sometimes roomate/owner cutie Temple Barr. Together they solve crimes and find love in sinful Las Vegas.


Fast Women
by Jennifer Crusie

Nell Dysart’s in trouble.Weighed down by an inexplicable divorce and a loss of appetite for everything, Nell is sleepwalking through life until her best friend finagles a job for her with a shabby little detective agency that has lots of potential and a boss who looks easy to manage. Gabe McKenna isn’t doing too well, either. His detective agency is wasting time on a blackmail case, his partner has decided he hates watching cheating spouses for money, and his ex-wife has just dumped him . . . again. The only thing that1s going his way is that his new secretary looks efficient, boring, and biddable.But looks can be deceiving, and soon Nell and Gabe are squaring off over embezzlement, business cards, vandalism, dog-napping, blackmail, Chinese food, unprofessional sex, and really ugly office furniture, all of which turn out to be the least of their problems. Because shortly after that, somebody starts killing people. And shortly after that, they start falling in love. Jennifer Crusie’s Fast Women will keep you guessing, laughing, rooting for Nell and Gabe (and hoping that Gabe’s cousin Riley wins their bet!).


Here on Earth
by Alice Hoffman

A middle-aged woman, along with her fifteen-year-old daughter, returns to her small Massachusetts hometown for the funeral of the housekeeper who raised her and finds herself thrust into the lives of the people she left behind.


Blue Diary
by Alice Hoffman

The courage to face the unthinkable is at the core of this magnificent new novel. How do we manage to confront the truths in our lives and find forgiveness in the most unforgiving of circumstances? How do we love truly and deeply in a world that is as brutal as it is beautiful?When Ethan Ford fails to show up for work on a brilliant summer morning, none of his neighbors would guess that for more than thirteen years, he has been running from his past. His true nature has been locked away, as hidden as his real identity. But sometimes locks spring open, and the devastating truths of Ethan Ford’s history shatter the small-town peace of Monroe, affecting family and friends alike.


Preserving for All Seasons
by Anne Gardon [641.42 Gar]

Preserving For All Seasons is a collection of more than 80 delightful small-batch recipes for every season. The book features: the new basics-using a food processor, food mill and blender, ingredients, jelly point and much more.


Once Upon a Town
by Bob Greene [940.548 Gre] [About North Platte, NE!]

In search of “the best America there ever was,” bestselling author and syndicated columnist Bob Greene finds it in a small Nebraska town few people pass through today — a town where Greene discovers the echoes of the most touching love story imaginable: a love story between a country and its sons.
North Platte, Nebraska, is as isolated as a small town can be, a solitary outpost in the vast midwestern plains, hours from the state’s urban centers of Omaha and Lincoln. But from Christmas Day 1941 to the end of World War II, a miracle happened there.

During the war, American soldiers from every city and walk of life rolled through North Platte on troop trains, en route to their ultimate destinations in Europe and the Pacific. The tiny town, wanting to offer the servicemen warmth and support, transformed its modest railroad depot into the North Platte Canteen — a place where soldiers could enjoy coffee, music, home-cooked food, magazines, and convivial, friendly conversation during a stopover that lasted only a few minutes. It was a haven for a never-ending stream of weary, homesick military personnel that provided them with the encouragement they needed to help them through the difficult times ahead.

Every day of the year, every day of the war, the Canteen — staffed and funded entirely by local volunteers — was open from 5 A.M. until the last troop train of the day pulled away after midnight. Astonishingly, this remote plains community of only twelve thousand people provided welcoming words, friendship, and baskets of food and treats to more than six million GIs by the time the war ended.

In this poignant and heartwarming eyewitness history, based on interviews with North Platte residents and the GIs who once passed through, Bob Greene unearths and reveals a classic, lost-in-the-mists-of-time American story of a grateful country honoring its brave and dedicated sons.


Not So Funny When It Happened
by Tim Cahill [910.2 Not]

Some of the best adventure stories come from misadventures — the pratfalls, faux pas, and cringing embarrassments that accompany life on the road. These tales share those moments when the best of plans fall by the wayside–replaced by the unforeseen, leavened by the saving grace of a sense of humor. Tim Cahill is joined by such beloved authors as Dave Barry, Anne Lamott, David Sedaris, and Adair Lara.


Fever, 1793
by Laurie Halse Anderson [j Anderson or jPB Anderson]

“Where’s Polly?” I asked as I dropped the bucket down the well. “Did you pass by the blacksmith’s?

“I spoke with her mother, with Mistress Logan,” Mother answered softly, looking at her neat rows of carrots.

“And?” I waved a mosquito away from my face.

“It happened quickly. Polly sewed by candlelight after dinner. Her mother repeated that over and over, ‘she sewed by candlelight after dinner.’ And then she collapsed.”

I released the handle and the bucket splashed, a distant sound.

“Matilda, Polly’s dead.”

August 1793. Fourteen-year-old Mattie Cook is ambitious, adventurous, and sick to death of listening to her mother. Mattie has plans of her own. She wants to turn the Cook Coffeehouse into the finest business in Philadelphia, the capital of the new United States.

But the waterfront is abuzz with reports of disease. “Fever” spreads from the docks and creeps toward Mattie’s home, threatening everything she holds dear.
As the cemeteries fill with fever victims, fear turns to panic, and thousands flee the city. Then tragedy strikes the coffeehouse, and Mattie is trapped in a living nightmare. Suddenly, her struggle to build a better life must give way to something even more important — the fight to stay alive..


The Visitant
by Kathleen O’Neal Gear & Michael Gear (Anasazi series)

Dr. Maureen Cole, one of the world’s foremost physical anthropologists, has been called in to examine and evaluate a mass grave discovered in New Mexico. The burial site contains only the shattered skulls of women and children. Dr. Cole is appalled at the find and begins working immediately to unravel the mystery of these deaths. But as she works, strange things begin to happen around her. Little incidents at first, then her generator quits, and she begins to hear whispering voices emanating from the plastic bags of bones.


July, 2002

Seabiscuit: An American Legend
by Laura Hillenbrand [798.2 Hil]

Seabiscuit was one of the most electrifying and popular attractions in sports history and the single biggest newsmaker in the world in 1938, receiving more coverage than FDR, Hitler, or Mussolini. But his success was a surprise to the racing establishment, which had written off the crooked-legged racehorse with the sad tail. Three men changed Seabiscuit’s fortunes:

Charles Howard was a onetime bicycle repairman who introduced the automobile to the western United States and became an overnight millionaire. When he needed a trainer for his new racehorses, he hired Tom Smith, a mysterious mustang breaker from the Colorado plains. Smith urged Howard to buy Seabiscuit for a bargain-basement price, then hired as his jockey Red Pollard, a failed boxer who was blind in one eye, half-crippled, and prone to quoting passages from Ralph Waldo Emerson. Over four years, these unlikely partners survived a phenomenal run of bad fortune, conspiracy, and severe injury to transform Seabiscuit from a neurotic, pathologically indolent also-ran into an American sports icon.


Envy
by Sandra Brown

A bestselling author, Parker Evans, hides behind a pseudonym, but a dark secret is about to come out. He is secretly writing a more literary novel called Envy–about the destructive rivalry between friends–that leads to the imprisonment of one and the bestselling success of the other.


The Defense
by D.W. Buffa

It was a one-way ticket out of his self-imposed isolation and into the courtroom on the right side of justice. It was a favor for his old friend Judge Horace Woolner. It was a once-in-a-lifetime chance to serve as special prosecutor in a case against a man sworn to uphold the law, Marshall Goodwin, the chief deputy district attorney accused of having his former wife murdered. It was an opportunity Joseph Antonelli couldn’t walk away from. But Antonelli is walking into more than he bargained for. The Goodwin case renews his appetite for the practice of law, and although Antonelli is determined to remain on the side of justice, there are many shades between right and wrong. And Antonelli may be over his head when Russell Gray, an urbane, worldly, and wealthy man from a prominent Portland family, is found murdered in his living room. Horace Woolner’s wife stands accused of the crime. With justice and love on the line, the stakes couldn’t be higher. In this stunning look at our legal system and our hearts, D. W. Buffa delivers on the promise of The Defense and takes us into the dark recesses of our courtrooms and our souls, where there are no easy answers.


Outer Banks
by Anne Rivers Siddons

From the beloved author of Peachtree Road comes her most compelling novel yet. A story of betrayed love and the strength of enduring friendship unfolds as four women attend their 25th-year college reunion.


Naked in Death
by J.D. Robb

The first novel in the #1 New York Times bestselling In Death series.

It is 2058, New York City. Technology now completely rules the world, but for New York Detective Eve Dallas, one irresistible impulse still rules the heart: passion…

Eve Dallas is a New York police lieutenant hunting for a ruthless killer. In over ten years on the force, she’s seen it all–and knows her survival depends on her instincts. And she’s going against every warning telling her not to get involved with Roarke, an Irish billionaire–and a suspect in Eve’s murder investigation. But passion and seduction have rules of their own, and it’s up to Eve to take a chance in the arms of a man she knows nothing about–except the addictive hunger of needing his touch.


Miss Julia Speaks Her Mind
by Ann B. Ross

When Wesley Lloyd Springer passed away, he left his proper Southern wife two legacies. The first, as befits a gentleman of means, is the whole of his sizeable estate. The second, so astonishing thereupon hangs this wonderful and witty tale.

Miss Julia, recently bereaved and newly wealthy widow, is only slightly bemused when one Hazel Marie Puckett appears at her door with a youngster in tow. But this perfectly practiced composure is quickly reduced when Hazel Marie unceremoniously announces her intentions: the child is Wesley Lloyd’s bastard son and, since the man left her penniless, she’s leaving little Lloyd in Miss Julia’s care. Suddenly, this longtime church member and pillar of her small community finds herself in the center of an unseemly scandal — and the guardian of a wan nine-year-old whose mere presence will turn her life upside down.

With razor wit and perfect Steel Magnolia poise, Miss Julia speaks her mind indeed — about a robbery, a kidnapping, and all the other disgraceful goings-on that are precipitated by her husband’s death. Fast-paced and charming, with a sure sense of comic drama and a cast of crazy characters, this beguiling novel will delight readers from first page to last.


Real Moments
by Barbara DeAngelis [158.1 Dea]

Bestselling author and renowned relationships expert Barbara De Angelis offers you her profound insights and powerful techniques for creating more real moments of meaning with your mate, your children, your work, and yourself. Barbara takes you on an inner journey that will help you discover the peace and fulfillment you’ve been seeking.

Real Moments is more than an uplifting book–it is a powerful invitation to transform your life and a practical manual for nourishing your spirit. Learn: How to tap into your own source of spiritual power and wisdom. How to find extraordinary miracles in each ordinary day. How to find your life’s work–and why it has nothing to do with your job. How you and your partner can rekindle and deepen your commitment–moment by passionate moment. How to find the gift that is inside each problem or crisis. How to be happy right now…with what you have and who you are.


Outlander
by Diana Gabaldon

Unrivaled storytelling. Unforgettable characters. Rich historical detail. These are the hallmarks of Diana Gabaldon’s work. Her New York Times bestselling Outlander novels have earned the praise of critics and captured the hearts of millions of fans. Here is the story that started it all, introducing two remarkable characters, Claire Beauchamp Randall and Jamie Fraser, in a spellbinding novel of passion and history that combines exhilarating adventure with a love story for the ages.

Scottish Highlands, 1945. Claire Randall, a former British combat nurse, is just back from the war and reunited with her husband on a second honeymoon when she walks through a standing stone in one of the ancient circles that dot the British Isles. Suddenly she is a Sassenach–an “outlander”–in a Scotland torn by war and raiding clans in the year of Our Lord . . . 1743.

Claire is catapulted into the intrigues of a world that threatens her life, and may shatter her heart. Marooned amid danger, passion, and violence, Claire learns her only chance of safety lies in Jamie Fraser, a gallant young Scots warrior. What begins in compulsion becomes urgent need, and Claire finds herself torn between two very different men, in two irreconcilable lives.


Crocodile on the Sandbank
by Elizabeth Peters

“If Indiana Jones were female, a wife, and a mother who lived in Victorian times, he would be Amelia Peabody Emerson.”- Publishers Weekly

Amelia Peabody, that indomitable product of the Victorian age, embarks on her debut Egyptian adventure armed with unshakable self-confidence, a journal to record her thoughts, and, of course, a sturdy umbrella. On her way to Cairo, Amelia rescues young Evelyn Barton-Forbes, who has been abandoned by her scoundrel lover. Together the two women sail up the Nile to an archeological site run by the Emerson brothers-the irascible but dashing Radcliffe and the amiable Walter. Soon their little party is increased by one-one mummy that is, and a singularly lively example of the species.

Strange visitations, suspicious accidents, and a botched kidnapping convince Amelia that there is a plot afoot to harm Evelyn. Now Amelia finds herself up against an unknown enemy-and perilous forces that threaten to make her first Egyptian trip also her last…


June, 2002

The Cabinet of Curiosities
by Douglas J. Preston & Lincoln Child

In an ancient tunnel underneath New York City a charnel house is discovered.

Inside are thirty-six bodies–all murdered and mutilated more than a century ago.

While FBI agent Pendergast investigates the old crimes, identical killings start to terrorize the city.

The nightmare has begun.

Again.


A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail
by Bill Bryson [917.4 Bry]

Back in America after twenty years in Britain, Bill Bryson decided to reacquaint himself with his native country by walking the 2,100-mile Appalachian Trail, which stretches from Georgia to Maine. The AT offers an astonishing landscape of silent forests and sparkling lakes — and to a writer with the comic genius of Bill Bryson, it also provides endless opportunities to witness the majestic silliness of his fellow human beings.

For a start there’s the gloriously out-of-shape Stephen Katz, a buddy from Iowa along for the walk. Despite Katz’s overwhelming desire to find cozy restaurants, he and Bryson eventually settle into their stride, and while on the trail they meet a bizarre assortment of hilarious characters. But A Walk in the Woods is more than just a laugh-out-loud hike. Bryson’s acute eye is a wise witness to this beautiful but fragile trail, and as he tells its fascinating history, he makes a moving plea for the conservation of America’s last great wilderness. An adventure, a comedy, and a celebration, A Walk in the Woods has become a modern classic of travel literature.


Too Many Tomatoes, Squash, Beans, and Other Good Things: A Cookbook for When Your Garden Explodes
by Lois Landau [ not in libraries’ collection — try our InterLibrary Loan service ]

A reissue of the unusual and classic cookbook with hundreds of savory and delectable recipes to help every gardener find ample ways to make use of the riches the garden provides.


The Ladies of Covington (series)
by Joan Medlicott

This popular ongoing series begins with The Ladies of Covington Send Their Love — Cautious Grace Singleton, uncertain of her place in an intimidating world. Outspoken Hannah Parrish, harboring private fear that may change her life. Fragile Ameila Declose, shattered by devastating grief. Circumstance has brought these disparate women of “a certain age” to a Pennsylvania boardinghouse where three square meals and a sagging bed is the most any of them can look forward to. But friendship will take them on a starting journey to a rundown North Carolina farmhouse where the unexpected suddenly seems not only welcome, but delightfully promising. And with nothing more than a bit of adventure in mind, each woman will be surprised to find that they years they’ve reclaimed from the shadow of twilight will offer something far more rare: confidence, competence, and even another chance at love….


Dieting for Dummies
by Jane Kirby, R.D. for the American Dietetic Association [613.25 Kir]

Does the world really need another book on dieting? More important,do you? Plenty of diet books make promises that this one doesn’t.Lots tell you that losing weight and keeping it off is easy whenyou know their secrets. Well, here’s a secret that the other bookswon’t tell you: Dieting gimmicks, like banning pasta, don’t work.And that’s precisely why you need this book. It’s not about fadplans or take-it-off-quick schemes. It’s about balancing healthfuleating and exercise for a lifetime.


May, 2002

One for the Money
by Janet Evanovich

ONE FINE MESS
Welcome to Trenton, New Jersey, home to wiseguys, average Joes, and Stephanie Plum, who sports a big attitude and even bigger money problems (since losing her job as a lingerie buyer for a department store). Stephanie needs cash–fast–but times are tough, and soon she’s forced to turn to the last resort of the truly desperate: family…

ONE FALSE MOVE
Stephanie lands a gig at her sleazy cousin Vinnie’s bail bonding company. She’s got no experience. But that doesn’t matter. Neither does the fact that the bail jumper in question is local vice cop Joe Morelli. From the time he first looked up her dress to the time he first got into her pants, to the time Steph hit him with her father’s Buick, M-o-r-e-l-l-i has spelled t-r-o-u-b-l-e. And now the hot guy is in hot water–wanted for murder…

ONE FOR THE MONEY
Abject poverty is a great motivator for learning new skills, but being trained in the school of hard knocks by people like psycho prizefighter Benito Ramirez isn’t. Still, if Stephanie can nab Morelli in a week, she’ll make a cool ten grand. All she has to do is become an expert bounty hunter overnight–and keep herself from getting killed before she gets her man…


Under the Tuscan Sun
by Frances Mayes [914.55 May]

The #1 San Francisco Chronicle bestseller that is an enchanting and lyrical look at the life, the traditions, and the cuisine of Tuscany, in the spirit of Peter Mayle’s A Year in Provence. Frances Mayes entered a wondrous new world when she began restoring an abandoned villa in the spectacular Tuscan countryside. There were unexpected treasures at every turn: faded frescos beneath the whitewash in her dining room, a vineyard under wildly overgrown brambles in the garden, and, in the nearby hill towns, vibrant markets and delightful people. In Under the Tuscan Sun,she brings the lyrical voice of a poet, the eye of a seasoned traveler, and the discerning palate of a cook and food writer to invite readers to explore the pleasures of Italian life and to feast at her table.


A Good Walk Spoiled
by John Feinstein [796.352 Fei]

In the highly acclaimed bestseller A Good Walk Spoiled, John Feinstein captures the world of professional golf as it has never been captured before. Traveling with the golfers on the PGA Tour, Feinstein gets inside the heads of the game’s greatest players as well as its struggling wannabes. Meet superstars like Nick Price, who nailed a fifty-foot putt at the seventeenth to win the British Open, and Paul Azinger, who marked his return from a bout with cancer with an emotional appearance at the Buick Open. Go behind the scenes for Davis Love III’s unforgettable come-from-behind victory in the Ryder Cup. In golf, Feinstein eloquently relates, the line that separates triumph from disappointment is incredibly fine. One week you’ve discovered the secret to the game; the next week you never want to play it again.


The Majors
by John Feinstein [ not in libraries’ collection — try our InterLibrary Loan service ]

What does it take to win a major championship and reach the absolute pinnacle of golf? Through a season of the four tournaments — the Masters, the U.S. Open, the British Open, and the PGA Championship — known collectively as the majors, John Feinstein takes us where the television cameras never go, both off the links and “inside the ropes”, as he reveals the special challenges and rituals, the frustrations and exhilaration, that mark the lives and careers of the world’s greatest golfers.


Guerrilla Prince: The Untold Story of Fidel Castro
by Georgie Ann Geyer [B C276g]

In this biography, Castro emerges as the betrayer of his own people, motivated partly by megalomania and also by extreme anti-Americanism. There are revelations about his personal life: his parents, wife, mistresses, children, and his colleagues in Cuba, the Soviet Union, and other nations.


April, 2002

The Beekeeper’s Apprentice; or On the Segregation of the Queen
by Laurie R. King

What would happen if Sherlock Holmes, a perfect man of the Victorian age — pompous, smug, and misogynisitic — were to come face to face with a twentieth-century female? If she grew to be a partner worthy of his great talents?

Laurie R. King, whose very different first novel, A Grave Talent, drew rave reviews, read the Conan Doyle stories and wondered about such an imaginary encounter. And following through, she has written The Beekeeper’s Apprentice.

1914, a young woman named Mary Russell meets a retired beekeeper on the Sussex Downs. His name is Sherlock Holmes. And although he may have all the Victorian “flaws” listed above, the Great Detective is no fool, and can spot a fellow intellect even in a fifteen-year-old woman.

So, at first informally, then consciously, he takes Mary Russell as his apprentice. They work on a few small local cases, then on a larger and more urgent investigation, which ends successfully. All the time, Mary is developing as a detective in her own right, with the benefit of the knowledge and experience of her mentor and, increasingly, friend.

And then the sky opens on them, and they find themselves the targets of a slippery, murderous, and apparently all-knowing adversary. Together they devise a plan to trap their enemy–a plan that may save their lives but may also kill off their relationship.

This is not a “Sherlock Holmes” story. It is the story of a modern young woman who comes to know and work with Holmes, the story of young woman coming to terms with herself and with this older man who embodies the age that is past.


Extra Virgin: A Young Woman Discovers the Italian Riviera, Where Every Month Is Enchanted
by Annie Hawes [914.518 Haw]

Extra Virgin introduces a major new voice in this delicious tale of two sisters who find unexpected joy in the isolated village of Diano San Pietro, Italy.

How could anyone leave such a lovely place to go to rack and ruin? It looks as if no one has ever been near it for decades, its land’s untended and its olive tress unkept. I want it every badly. It ought to be mine.

In 1983 a pale Annie Hawes and her equally pale sister decide to leave England for the sun-drenched olive groves of a small Italian town in Liguria. With fantasies of handsome tanned men and swimming in the sea urging them on, they sign up to graft roses-something they know nothing about, but as it is a bad year for olives, they figure they can fake a knowledge of roses for ten weeks. What they don’t count on is falling in love with Italy-and with one old farmhouse in particular.

Although they quickly realize that Liguria is not Tuscany — it is undiscovered by tourists, and its inhabitants (none of whom appear to be handsome, and none of whom seem to be under forty) have strict ideas about what young Englishwomen should and shouldn’t be doing(“to go swimming in seawater outside the month of July or August is even worse for your health than drinking cappuccino after twelve noon!”) they simply cannot resist the charm exuded by the little town. Annie, who has never wanted to settle down anywhere, now doesn’t want to leave. How will she find a way to make this old derelict farmhouse her own? What will the Ligurians think about their wild new neighbor with her strange ways staying on for good?

Extra Virgin is a wonderful memoir, written with irresistible verve and humor. Annie Hawe’s adventures will captivate readers who have wondered what happens when you fall in love with a certain house, on a certain hill, near a certain village. After eighteen years living as a Ligurian, Annie tells a story that is much more realistic than nay other book on Italy, and Extra Virgin is sure to put Liguria in the minds of travelers, armchair and real alike.


What Plant Where
by Roy Lancaster [635.9 Lan]

An invaluable practical planner for all gardeners, What Plant Where suggests plants for more than 60 different sites and decorative effects in the garden.


Perennial All-Stars
by Jeff Cox [635.932 Cox]

Create the perennial garden you’ve always dreamed of with an illustrated guide to 150 of the best. Perennial All-Stars is a trustworthy guide & tour through the jungle of perennials that are available from nurseries, garden centers, & mail-order sources.


The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible
by Edward C. Smith [635 qSmi]

Discover the last W.O.R.D. in vegetable gardening with Ed Smith’s amazing gardening system. By integrating four principles — Wide beds, Organic methods, Raised beds, and Deep beds — Smith reinvents vegetable gardening, making it possible for everyone to have the best, most successful garden ever. By following this complete system you cultivate deep, powerful soil that nourishes plants and discourages pests and disease. The result is fewer weeds, healthier plants, and lots of great-tasting vegetables. Plus, you’ll enjoy gardening as you never have before. The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible — the last W.O.R.D. in vegetable gardening.


Sandry’s Book
by Tamora Pierce

When four strange, and strangely talented, youngsters are brought to Winding Circle by master mage Niko they find themselves drawn together in a Circle of Magic—a circle that binds them despite their differences.Tamora Pierce, America’s most popular writer of young adult fantasy novels, weaves her own special magic in the opening volume of her wildly popular Circle of Magic quartet.


A Place of Execution
by Val McDermid

Winter 1963: two children have disappeared off the streets of Manchester; the murderous careers of Myra Hindley and Ian Brady have begun. On a freezlng day in December, another child goes missing: thirteen-year-old Alison Carter vanishes from her town, an insular community that distrusts the outside world. For the young George Bennett, a newly promoted inspector, it is the beginning of his most difficult and harrowing case: a murder with no body, an investigation with more dead ends and closed faces than he’d have found in the anonymity of the inner city, and an outcome which reverberates through the years.

Decades later he finally tells his story to journalist Catherine Heathcote, but just when the book is poised for publication, Bennett unaccountably tries to pull the plug. He has new information which he refuses to divulge, new information that threatens the very foundations of his existence. Catherine is forced to re-investigate the past, with results that turn the world upside down.

A Greek tragedy in modern England, A Place of Execution is a taut psychological thriller that explores, exposes and explodes the border between reality and illusion in a multi-layered narrative that turns expectations on their head and reminds us that what we know is what we do not know. A Place of Execution is winner of the 2000 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and a 2001 Edgar Award Nominee for Best Novel.


March, 2002

Walks the Fire
by Stephanie Grace Whitson

Book One in the Praire Winds SeriesCaptured by Indians, Jessie King learns to suvive when unexpected lessons of friendship ans love sustain her.


Soaring Eagle
by Stephanie Grace Whitson

Book Two in the Praire Winds Series

Widow LisBeth King returns to Nebraska and a world shattered with violence. Will her ties to an angry warrior and a disillusioned soldier pave the way to her new home?


They Went Whistling: Women Wayfarers, Warriors, Runaways and Renegades
by Barbara Holland [305.4 Hol]

Women weren’t supposed to take their lives into their own hands, light out by themselves, have independent, off-the-beaten-path adventures. Nonetheless, throughout history there have been women who cast off the shackles of expectation, stepped out of the cave, and slashed their way into history. Elegant, witty, sometimes hilarious, sometimes moving, always perceptive, Barbara Holland tells us the stories of women, famous and infamous, celebrated and unsung, who have stepped over the edge. Here are Cleopatra, Joan of Arc, Bonnie Parker (of Bonnie and Clyde), Amelia Earhart, George Sand, Isadora Duncan, Mata Hari, Belle Starr, and their lesser-known sisters in adventure and spirit–Gertrude Bell, uncrowned queen of Iraq; Daisy Bates, Victorian anthropologist of the Australian aborigines; American pirates Anne Bonny and Mary Read; Queen Jinjun of Angola. These irrepressible adventurers, who reveled in the limitlessness of possibility and desire, are brought irresistibly to life by Barbara Holland in a book that will entrance and delight readers.


Woven on the Wind: Women Write About Friendship in the Sagebrush West
edited by Linda Hasselstrom [810.098 Has]

The American West conjures images of wide-open spaces, harsh but beautiful landscapes embroidered with winding rivers and streams, long dusty roads to nowhere, sagging barbed wire fences that separate neighbors in the loosest sense. Here the only hustle-bustle is the wind gathering strength across the plains and the rush to get a day’s work done before darkness swallows the countryside whole. In this region where time and space are writ large and solitude is a fact of life, how exactly do friendships among women develop, let alone thrive? What does that human connection provide; what does it mean? And what can these friendships teach us about these women, about ourselves?

In the grassroots tradition of LEANING INTO THE WIND, WOVEN ON THE WIND collects true stories, poems, and reflections from women of the interior West–also known as sagebrush country–writing about their kinship with other women. A communion of voices, WOVEN ON THE WIND tells of the beauties, ironies, rigors, heartbreak, and humor of western life and how it is enriched by friendships past and present.

A mother makes a harrowing bus trip during a legendary storm to bring her blind daughter home for Christmas with the help of unlikely friends. A trio of women steal a motorcycle from an estranged husband for a wild ride to redemption. A newlywed finds a true sense of family in the faces of strangers, her new Black Crow kin. Handmade gifts left in a roadside mailbox help shepherd a terribly pregnant young wife through a harsh Montana winter. Through marriage, childbirth, drought, doubt, careers, catastrophes, and change, these western women stand strong or lean gratefully on their friends. The voices in this volume–unsentimental, unflinching, and utterly unforgettable–take us into the souls, kitchens, barns, and hearts of nearly 150 women and show us how, in a life stripped down to what really matters, friendship can both ground us and help us to grow.


Life Without Limits: Clarify What You Want, Redefine Your Dreams, Become the Person You Want to Be
by Lucinda Bassett [158.1 Bas]

In Life Without Limits, Bassett asks, “If you could have, do, and be anything right now, what would you ask for?” Eight out of ten people are unable to answer this simple question.

Life Without Limits is the complete guide to attaining abundance in every area of your life. It will help you to achieve satisfaction and fulfillment personally, professionally, and financially. Once you have defined what success means for you, you will clarify your dreams and start pursuing them. Opportunities will present themselves, new doors will open, and you will begin to live the life you were meant to live: a life without limits.

“Begin now to change the person you are into the person you know you have the potential to become.”


Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus That Caused It
by Gina Kolata [614.518 Kol]

The fascinating, true story of the world’s deadliest disease. In 1918, the Great Flu Epidemic felled the young and healthy virtually overnight. An estimated forty million people died as the epidemic raged. Children were left orphaned and families were devastated. As many American soldiers were killed by the 1918 flu as were killed in battle during World War I. And no area of the globe was safe. Eskimos living in remote outposts in the frozen tundra were sickened and killed by the flu in such numbers that entire villages were wiped out. Scientists have recently rediscovered shards of the flu virus frozen in Alaska and preserved in scraps of tissue in a government warehouse. Gina Kolata, an acclaimed reporter for The New York Times, unravels the mystery of this lethal virus with the high drama of a great adventure story. Delving into the history of the flu and previous epidemics, detailing the science and the latest understanding of this mortal disease, Kolata addresses the prospects for a great epidemic recurring, and, most important, what can be done to prevent it.


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